It’s Fall Conference Season!  Join CSAA-D students and faculty for presentations during the 2017 Southern Association for College Student Affairs conference with NASPA Region III in Chattanooga, TN.  Tweet us @saUGA411 and/or use our program hashtag #saUGA411 to communicate throughout the conferences.

2017 SACSA Annual Conference with NASPA Region III
“New Directions: A Climate of Change”
October 28th-30th
Chattanooga, TN

Sunday, October 29th 

An Inclusive Measure: The Art of Applying Critical Theories to Common Assessment Practices
1:00 to 2:00pm, Amphitheater
While scholars have written about applying critical theories to assessment practices and have advanced rationales for using assessment for social justice purposes, similar discussions related to student affairs practices, though recently emerging, are scarce. Additionally, whereas traditional approaches to assessment can stymie efforts to address institutional inequities, critical approaches can facilitate these efforts through “expos[ing] and address[ing] power, privilege, and structures; consider[ing] thoughtfully histories and contexts; mak[ing] explicit assumptions and intentions; and eschew[ing] colorblind and ideological neutral claims” (Deluca Fernandez, 2015, p. 5). This session focuses on the efforts of four practitioners in applying critical and social justice education theories to assessment practices. After their presentations, presenters will facilitate a discussion with audience members about applying critical theories to their own assessment work.
Meg Evans, University of Georgia
Matthew J. Smith, University of Georgia
Jason K. Wallace, University of Georgia

Melvin A. Whitehead, University of Georgia

#StopHelicopterSuper vision2k17: Policing of Black Professional Women who “Don’t Want to Come Off as Boisterous’, ‘Loud’, and ‘Lazy”
1:00 to 2:00pm, Rose
“Helicopter parents” are often described as the bane of many campus leader’s existence due to their overbearing and overpolicing of student experiences. But what happens when supervisors micromanage employees to a point that they display similar “helicopter” traits? This session explores strategies for effective cross and intra cultural supervision of Black women in student affairs and higher education. Based upon research findings in a critical qualitative research study, attendees will learn ways in which Black women report supervisory (and peer) policing. Participants will leave with strategies to identify and combat helicopter supervision of Black women professionals as colleagues and campus leaders.
Brittany M. Williams, University of Georgia

What Will I Wear Today?: Misogynoir, Homoantagonism, & Anti-Blackness in “Professional Dress”
3:15 to 4:15pm, Grand 3
This interactive panel presentation features discussions on issues of “professional dress” policies as forms of oppression, exclusion, homoantagonism, and antiblackness in workplace settings. Situated within the context of current events and personal experiences, attendees will engage presenters by contending with the existence and operationalization of hidden curriculums associated with standards of dress. Issues of gender, race and ethnicity, homoantagonism, and body size contribute to this nuanced dialogue. Critical feminist literature (Bailey, 2014; Crenshaw, 1993; Harris-Perry, 2011), Quare Theory (Johnson, 2005; Means & Yaeger 2013), and African American Male Theory (Bush & Bush, 2013) serve as theoretical underpinnings for this discussion. Panelists and participants will reflect on imbalances in dress code executions and co-construct strategies for dress code innovation on their respective campus.
Brittany M. Williams, University of Georgia
Qua’Aisa Williams, University of Georgia
Lamesha Andrews, University of Georgia
Michael R. Williams, Western Illinois University
Melvin A. Whitehead, University of Georgia

Monday, October 30th

For Better or Worse?: Effective Rubric Use in Student Affairs
8:30 to 9:30am, Kelley
Rubrics are used in a wide range of areas within student affairs, including: hiring for positions (be they faculty, full-time staff, part-time staff, graduate assistants, and undergraduate student workers), evaluating applicants for graduate programs, evaluating conference proposals, tenure review, and many others. While the use of rubrics is undeniably widespread, there is a need for greater interrogation of the effective execution of rubrics ? This session explores types of rubrics predominantly found in student affairs and examines how they can be best operationalized by student affairs practitioners and faculty. Participants can expect to learn how to foster a climate of change and effective execution of rubrics in student affairs evaluation and assessment.
Matthew J. Smith, University of Georgia
Brittany M. Williams, University of Georgia

“And We Rise Up:” Black Women’s Personal, Professional & Racial Identity Development in Higher Education
9:45 to 10:45 am, Walker
Black women face unique challenges in predominantly white higher education environments (Lewis, Mendenhall, Harwood, & Browne, 2013; ShorterGooden, 2004; Winkle-Wagner, 2009). From negotiating misogynoir to combatting perceptions of presumed incompetence (Harris, et.al., 2012), Black women across positionality and university status are impacted by their subordinated race and gender identities. In this lightning round session, attendees will glean insight into Black women’s experiences at predominantly white institutions with (1) colorism; (2) first generation Black women’s identity development; and, (3) career development and workplace integration of Black first gen professional women. Three themes connect each of these research studies: (1) self- and external policing of Black women’s bodies; (2) hair as a personal and political process; and, (3) resistance as a method for combating oppressive messages.
Brittany M. Williams, University of Georgia
Qua’Aisa Williams, University of Georgia
Lamesha Andrews, University of Georgia

“Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop”: Digital Space Interventions for First Generation Doctoral Students
2:00 to 3:00pm, Littleton
Current literature on first-generation college students primarily focuses on the undergraduate experience. Consequently, there is a lack of literature regarding the experiences and support needs of first generation doctoral students (FGDS). With the rise of technology and social media in daily life, it is imperative that we embrace digital spaces as an intervention for supporting students. In this session, attendees will explore digital spaces as interventions to address issues pertaining to prospective and current FGDS.
Lamesha Andrews, University of Georgia
Raven Cokley, University of Georgia
Jason K. Wallace, University of Georgia

Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *